Suicide bombing in Afghanistan kills six US NATO members

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

On Monday, a suicide bomber blew himself up on a motorcycle in Bagram District, Afghanistan. The bombing killed six US NATO service members and injured several others.

According to NATO and Afghan officials, the bombing occurred at 1:30pm local time in a village near Bagram Airfield. Bagram Airfield is located about 40 km (25 mi) north of Kabul, the Afghan capital.

The bombing killed six US NATO soldiers. The US Department of Defense delayed officially releasing their names, following policy, but all the victims have been identified.

One of them is Joseph Lemm, aged 45. Lemm served fifteen years as an officer of the New York City Police Department and has a wife and two children.

Another is Adrianna Vorderbruggen, an openly lesbian US Air Force major. Vorderbruggen advocated repealing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell and is now married to her same-sex partner. The couple has a son.

The others are Peter Taub from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Michael Anthony Cinco from Rio Grande Valley, Texas, age 28; Chester McBride Jr., Statesboro, Georgia; and Louis Bonacasa, Coram, New York.

The bombing also injured others, including two US military personnel and, according to an Afghan official, three local police officers.

Via email and Twitter, the Taliban, whose regime the US overthrew after invading the country in 2001, claimed responsibility to the bombing.

Currently, about 10,000 US, and less than half as many NATO, military personnel remain in Afghanistan.

Train hits collapsed bridge in Czech Republic, killing ten

Friday, August 8, 2008

An express train struck a collapsed motorway bridge in the Czech Republic, leaving 7 people dead and 64 injured. The EuroCity train, which was en route from Kraków, Poland to Prague, derailed after it collided while traveling at 134km/h (84mph).

According to Czech Railways spokesman Radek Joklik, “it probably hit part of a motorway bridge under construction which fell onto the track.” It is believed that the bridge, which is near Studénka, may have fallen onto the train, crushing carriages below it.

The train, which was carrying 400 people, saw a derailment of its locomotive and first three passenger carriages.

Rescue operations are underway, with 16 fire brigades and 30 vehicles at the scene, which is 215 miles from Prague and close to the Polish border. Numerous ambulances and several helicopters are transporting the wounded to hospital.

Many of the passengers were traveling to a music festival in Pardubice. The toll of dead and injured could rise further as investigators release information.

Panama: Eleven years of a conflict between PPC and ex-workers of Port Authority

Friday, June 15, 2007

Eleven years ago the Panama Ports Company (PPC) got a concession to manage Panamanian Ports at the gates of the Panama Canal — Balboa and Cristobal. They made a contract with Panamanian State to get this concession. This concession began a conflict between ex-workers of these Ports (previously managed by Panamanian State by Port Authority) and PPC.

These Port Authority’s ex-workers says PPC violated a law written in 1992. The law states that during any privatization of State property, including land and enterprises, the workers must be offered to buy shares of the land or company. The contract doesn’t state any offer of shares to the ex-workers.

Representatives of ex-workers claim that they must receive a pay, because the shares were not offered to them.

On the last 3 years, Jose Sanchez (pictured) has set some meetings with PPC representatives. Almost all meeting were suspended because PPC representatives have not attended them.

It may seem that no one in Panama outside the engaged parties knows about the dispute. According to Mr. Sanchez there is a mass media campaign to hide events of this conflict.

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Stanford physicists print smallest-ever letters ‘SU’ at subatomic level of 1.5 nanometres tall

Wednesday, February 4, 2009

A new historic physics record has been set by scientists for exceedingly small writing, opening a new door to computing‘s future. Stanford University physicists have claimed to have written the letters “SU” at sub-atomic size.

Graduate students Christopher Moon, Laila Mattos, Brian Foster and Gabriel Zeltzer, under the direction of assistant professor of physics Hari Manoharan, have produced the world’s smallest lettering, which is approximately 1.5 nanometres tall, using a molecular projector, called Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) to push individual carbon monoxide molecules on a copper or silver sheet surface, based on interference of electron energy states.

A nanometre (Greek: ?????, nanos, dwarf; ?????, metr?, count) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one billionth of a metre (i.e., 10-9 m or one millionth of a millimetre), and also equals ten Ångström, an internationally recognized non-SI unit of length. It is often associated with the field of nanotechnology.

“We miniaturised their size so drastically that we ended up with the smallest writing in history,” said Manoharan. “S” and “U,” the two letters in honor of their employer have been reduced so tiny in nanoimprint that if used to print out 32 volumes of an Encyclopedia, 2,000 times, the contents would easily fit on a pinhead.

In the world of downsizing, nanoscribes Manoharan and Moon have proven that information, if reduced in size smaller than an atom, can be stored in more compact form than previously thought. In computing jargon, small sizing results to greater speed and better computer data storage.

“Writing really small has a long history. We wondered: What are the limits? How far can you go? Because materials are made of atoms, it was always believed that if you continue scaling down, you’d end up at that fundamental limit. You’d hit a wall,” said Manoharan.

In writing the letters, the Stanford team utilized an electron‘s unique feature of “pinball table for electrons” — its ability to bounce between different quantum states. In the vibration-proof basement lab of Stanford’s Varian Physics Building, the physicists used a Scanning tunneling microscope in encoding the “S” and “U” within the patterns formed by the electron’s activity, called wave function, arranging carbon monoxide molecules in a very specific pattern on a copper or silver sheet surface.

“Imagine [the copper as] a very shallow pool of water into which we put some rocks [the carbon monoxide molecules]. The water waves scatter and interfere off the rocks, making well defined standing wave patterns,” Manoharan noted. If the “rocks” are placed just right, then the shapes of the waves will form any letters in the alphabet, the researchers said. They used the quantum properties of electrons, rather than photons, as their source of illumination.

According to the study, the atoms were ordered in a circular fashion, with a hole in the middle. A flow of electrons was thereafter fired at the copper support, which resulted into a ripple effect in between the existing atoms. These were pushed aside, and a holographic projection of the letters “SU” became visible in the space between them. “What we did is show that the atom is not the limit — that you can go below that,” Manoharan said.

“It’s difficult to properly express the size of their stacked S and U, but the equivalent would be 0.3 nanometres. This is sufficiently small that you could copy out the Encyclopaedia Britannica on the head of a pin not just once, but thousands of times over,” Manoharan and his nanohologram collaborator Christopher Moon explained.

The team has also shown the salient features of the holographic principle, a property of quantum gravity theories which resolves the black hole information paradox within string theory. They stacked “S” and the “U” – two layers, or pages, of information — within the hologram.

The team stressed their discovery was concentrating electrons in space, in essence, a wire, hoping such a structure could be used to wire together a super-fast quantum computer in the future. In essence, “these electron patterns can act as holograms, that pack information into subatomic spaces, which could one day lead to unlimited information storage,” the study states.

The “Conclusion” of the Stanford article goes as follows:

According to theory, a quantum state can encode any amount of information (at zero temperature), requiring only sufficiently high bandwidth and time in which to read it out. In practice, only recently has progress been made towards encoding several bits into the shapes of bosonic single-photon wave functions, which has applications in quantum key distribution. We have experimentally demonstrated that 35 bits can be permanently encoded into a time-independent fermionic state, and that two such states can be simultaneously prepared in the same area of space. We have simulated hundreds of stacked pairs of random 7 times 5-pixel arrays as well as various ideas for pathological bit patterns, and in every case the information was theoretically encodable. In all experimental attempts, extending down to the subatomic regime, the encoding was successful and the data were retrieved at 100% fidelity. We believe the limitations on bit size are approxlambda/4, but surprisingly the information density can be significantly boosted by using higher-energy electrons and stacking multiple pages holographically. Determining the full theoretical and practical limits of this technique—the trade-offs between information content (the number of pages and bits per page), contrast (the number of measurements required per bit to overcome noise), and the number of atoms in the hologram—will involve further work.Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas, Christopher R. Moon, Laila S. Mattos, Brian K. Foster, Gabriel Zeltzer & Hari C. Manoharan

The team is not the first to design or print small letters, as attempts have been made since as early as 1960. In December 1959, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, who delivered his now-legendary lecture entitled “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom,” promised new opportunities for those who “thought small.”

Feynman was an American physicist known for the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as work in particle physics (he proposed the parton model).

Feynman offered two challenges at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society, held that year in Caltech, offering a $1000 prize to the first person to solve each of them. Both challenges involved nanotechnology, and the first prize was won by William McLellan, who solved the first. The first problem required someone to build a working electric motor that would fit inside a cube 1/64 inches on each side. McLellan achieved this feat by November 1960 with his 250-microgram 2000-rpm motor consisting of 13 separate parts.

In 1985, the prize for the second challenge was claimed by Stanford Tom Newman, who, working with electrical engineering professor Fabian Pease, used electron lithography. He wrote or engraved the first page of Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, at the required scale, on the head of a pin, with a beam of electrons. The main problem he had before he could claim the prize was finding the text after he had written it; the head of the pin was a huge empty space compared with the text inscribed on it. Such small print could only be read with an electron microscope.

In 1989, however, Stanford lost its record, when Donald Eigler and Erhard Schweizer, scientists at IBM’s Almaden Research Center in San Jose were the first to position or manipulate 35 individual atoms of xenon one at a time to form the letters I, B and M using a STM. The atoms were pushed on the surface of the nickel to create letters 5nm tall.

In 1991, Japanese researchers managed to chisel 1.5 nm-tall characters onto a molybdenum disulphide crystal, using the same STM method. Hitachi, at that time, set the record for the smallest microscopic calligraphy ever designed. The Stanford effort failed to surpass the feat, but it, however, introduced a novel technique. Having equaled Hitachi’s record, the Stanford team went a step further. They used a holographic variation on the IBM technique, for instead of fixing the letters onto a support, the new method created them holographically.

In the scientific breakthrough, the Stanford team has now claimed they have written the smallest letters ever – assembled from subatomic-sized bits as small as 0.3 nanometers, or roughly one third of a billionth of a meter. The new super-mini letters created are 40 times smaller than the original effort and more than four times smaller than the IBM initials, states the paper Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas, published online in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. The new sub-atomic size letters are around a third of the size of the atomic ones created by Eigler and Schweizer at IBM.

A subatomic particle is an elementary or composite particle smaller than an atom. Particle physics and nuclear physics are concerned with the study of these particles, their interactions, and non-atomic matter. Subatomic particles include the atomic constituents electrons, protons, and neutrons. Protons and neutrons are composite particles, consisting of quarks.

“Everyone can look around and see the growing amount of information we deal with on a daily basis. All that knowledge is out there. For society to move forward, we need a better way to process it, and store it more densely,” Manoharan said. “Although these projections are stable — they’ll last as long as none of the carbon dioxide molecules move — this technique is unlikely to revolutionize storage, as it’s currently a bit too challenging to determine and create the appropriate pattern of molecules to create a desired hologram,” the authors cautioned. Nevertheless, they suggest that “the practical limits of both the technique and the data density it enables merit further research.”

In 2000, it was Hari Manoharan, Christopher Lutz and Donald Eigler who first experimentally observed quantum mirage at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. In physics, a quantum mirage is a peculiar result in quantum chaos. Their study in a paper published in Nature, states they demonstrated that the Kondo resonance signature of a magnetic adatom located at one focus of an elliptically shaped quantum corral could be projected to, and made large at the other focus of the corral.

“Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes

Friday, January 19, 2007

In November 2006 Pensacola, Florida evangelist Kent Hovind and his wife, Jo, were found guilty on 58 federal counts of “willful failure” to payroll taxes, structuring bank withdrawals, and obstructing federal agents. On January 19, 2007 Hovind was given ten years in federal prison, ordered to pay $640,000 in owed funds to the Internal Revenue Service, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Originally in November, Hovind was ordered to forfeit $430,400 and faced a maximum of 288 years in prison.

Contents

  • 1 Trial
  • 2 Sentencing
  • 3 Related news
  • 4 Sources
  • 5 External links

Chevrolet Tracker Used Car Sale}

Submitted by: Thomas Champeval

A used Chevrolet Tracker combines a smaller SUV and the power of a V6 engine that is well trusted. There are several used four-door models available at used car dealerships that offer the strength and durability of a classic Chevy Truck. It is a vehicle that is adaptable and one that lends itself to active life style.

The Tracker is still offering its owner the ability to tackle almost any task, from the daily urban travel right up to an off road adventure, this is a true sport utility that can perform on the road and on the land.

Like all used Chevy vehicles the Tracker begins with a solid foundation, the steel frame which is built under the Tracker gives it an excellent smooth and comfortable operation on the road and the ability to go almost anywhere the driver wants to take it. Its chassis and high distance from the ground giving the Tracker many advantages for off-road use over its competitors who employ a construction of chassis and bodywork, more commonly used for cars not real on-road, off-road used utility vehicles.

A used Chevy Tracker is a strong and long lasting used auto in which you can place your trust. Precision hydraulic rack and pinion is the root of its very safe performance, its rear suspension of high sensitivity with a design with five links is intended to provide a unique perception of firmness and control in the turns.

A pre-owned Tracker offers consumers utility, performance, competence, value, style and all at a reasonable price. A used auto dealer may be able to offer the Tracker in either two-wheel or four wheel-drive options depending on which used vehicle version is available.

The Tracker provides the essential power for those who want to buy a used car, but would perhaps like the added usefulness of a used SUV. All models offer as standard equipment a powerful V-6 engine from 2.5L DOHC, 24 valves that generates 165 horsepower while providing an exceptionally good level of fuel efficiency.

A used Tracker also includes as standard AM / FM radio and CD player, plus air conditioning, rack and pinion steering, folding rear seat and transfer box with changes on progress in the model four-wheel-drive. The Tracker LT models add electric locking doors and much more good value used vehicle options.

The used Tracker has had three separate generations of used vehicles the second generation is the five-door version of the used Tracker. Its range of gasoline engines is composed of engines 1.3, 1.6, 2.0 and 2.5L engine capacity.

The third generation (2005-present) both bodies of the third generation used vehicle models went on sale in late 200. It is totally different from the second generation, is much bigger, and shares the platform with the General Motors bigger SUVs. The Grand used Trackers 4×4 system has a four-wheel traction. The three-door version is approved for four passengers, while the five-door has five seats.

This flexible and highly adaptable used vehicle is very popular and sought after on used auto dealerships lots; seek one out for a first class used vehicle driving experience.

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IEEE approves 802.11n standard after six years

Saturday, September 12, 2009

On Friday, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) ratified the next generation of Wi-Fi Alliance certification known as 802.11n. The path to ratification began on September 11, 2003 with 11 major drafts of the specification over the course of six years. Even though just approved, wireless devices have been available on the the market for over two years, running on what is known as “draft n” or “pre-N”.

The 802.11n standard operates on both the 2.4Ghz and 5.0Ghz frequencies. This will allow it to be backwards compatible with 802.11a, 802.11b and 802.11g, provided that the base station has dual radios. The speeds of 802.11n are substantially faster than that of its predecessors with a maximum theoretical throughput of 600Mbit/s.

Very few additions were made to the 802.11n draft standard over the last two years, so most if not all “draft n” hardware available on the market today is expected to be compatible with n-standard devices available in the future. In a similar process of the upgrade from “pre-G” to 802.11g, it is expected that most manufacturers of wireless hardware will release new firmware to bring all draft devices up to full standard compliance.

Enjoy, Get Rich, And Own A Daycare Business

By Loren Yadeski

If you look at some of the richest man in the world, you will find something common in them. It is not that they come from rich descendants. It is not that they are intelligent, it is simply the way they handle money through businesses. In simple words, they are very intelligent when it comes to handling money. They made their fortunes in businesses that they enjoy.

In reality, the greatest income will come in business. Although it is tough in the world of business, you need to survive and outclass the competitors. You need to find the niche that suits you best, you need continues learning and developing and for sure, the returns are superb. Engaging in a business or businesses is such a wonderful experience. Most of the time, you are the boss of your work, you have the big opportunity to get wealthy. With a business, you can take advantage of the opportunity and the demands of the prevailing society. Most of all, in business, you are enjoying what you are doing and at the same time, you can earn huge amount of cash. However, the earnings vary everyday. You may get an average today and huge tomorrow. It does not matter, what you earn is better than being an employee. As a businessperson, you earn what is due for you, unlike as an employee, you are underpaid for your work most of the time.

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So if you want to enjoy working and at the same time to be wealthy, you may first consider what is the trend today. For instance, it is a fact that every household have both parents working and then leaving their kids to someone else care. Even single parents that do not have ample time for their kids because of work are increasing. With this fact, you can take advantage of it and make a leaving out of it, especially if you have the feeling of closeness to children. Starting to own a daycare business is a good business choice if you have what it takes to take care and provide the necessary need of children.

If you pursue in this field remember that you are pursuing a business as a general, hence you will encounter several requirements. You have to secure documents, business permits, licenses, the necessary equipments, and teaching tools. You must also consider the kids that you will take care, what are their needs, special attention needed, specific foods that they eat, and so on.

Good thing there are kind people that shares their thought on how to be successful in this kind of business. To own a daycare business is difficult, you must be able to learn the environment, the needs of your clients as well as outplay your competitors. In this website, http://ownadaycare.com, a plain homemaker and a mom provides interested person the necessary tools to be successful in owning a daycare center. She provided a downloadable ‘Daycare-Business-in-a-Box’ that contains all the necessary information to an easy journey in this business. Grab your own copy now for just $97 and then eanr superb profits!

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